Archive for July, 2006

Opera 9

Opera 9

Opera Software today released Opera 9, its newest Web browser for PCs. You can download it free in more than 25 languages for Windows, Mac, Linux and other platforms from www.opera.com. Opera 9 enhances the way you access, share and use online content by including innovative widgets – fun, small and useful Web programs – and support for BitTorrent™, the popular file distribution technology. Even while adding these improvements, Opera 9 maintains the security and speed millions of Opera fans have come to expect.

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Space shuttle launches on key mission

Space shuttle launches on key mission

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.–The space shuttle Discovery roared off its Florida launch pad and soared into orbit on Tuesday on a key mission whose failure could end the U.S. shuttle program prematurely.

After two weather postponements during the weekend, skies cleared at the Kennedy Space Center and allowed NASA to successfully launch Discovery on just the second shuttle flight since the destruction of the shuttle Columbia and the deaths of seven crew members in February 2003.

Discovery, carrying six Americans and a German, lifted off from the seaside launch site at 2:38 p.m. EDT and jettisoned its booster rockets about 2 and a half minutes into the flight. It reached orbit about 9 minutes after launch.

“Discovery is ready, the weather is beautiful and America is ready to return the space shuttle to flight,” said launch director Mike Leinbach a few minutes before liftoff. “So good luck and Godspeed Discovery.”

“I can’t think of a better place to be, here on the Fourth of July,” shuttle commander Steve Lindsey replied, referring to U.S. Independence Day.

Discovery’s 12-day mission is critical to NASA’s plan to finish the half-built, $100 billion space station before the shuttle fleet is retired in 2010. Another accident or serious problem likely would ground the shuttles permanently.

NASA launched the 115th shuttle mission since 1981 after managers decided a crack in the foam that insulates Discovery’s massive external tank posed no launch hazard.

You can read more by clicking on the headline link about I just thought this was great enough to blog about. Also some bad news I also heard that North Korea test fired some missles today anyone else here of about that?

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2.0.4 and 2.1 Bug Hunt

Bug Independence Day is July 4th! To help shake the bugs out of the upcoming 2.0.4 and 2.1 releases, we’re holding a Bug Hunt next week. We’ll be finding and fixing bugs and cleaning up the bug tracker. All are welcome to join us in the wordpress-bugs IRC channel as we go on the hunt. We’ll get things started at Midnight between Tuesday, July 4, 2006 and Wednesday, July 5, 2006 San Francisco time and keep going for 24 hours or until everyone gets tired. We’ll have folks keepng vigil at all hours so drop by at whatever time is convenient to you.

Click here for more of the hunt at wordpress.

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Flickr Photos

Flickr Photos

Some really great photos on flickr worth checking out

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The history of draconian error handling in XML

The history of draconian error handling in XML

I suspect that most of the people discussing liberal XML parsing today are unaware that Tim Bray was the singular force behind the fail on first error behavior of XML. Virtually everyone in the XML working group disagreed with him, and many people pleaded for a sane method of error recovery, or at least the application-specific option to provide error recovery that was suitable for the application. (XML is uniquely suited for such error-tolerant applications. Because it is text-based and has so much redundant information, like verbose end tags, it provides easier re-entry points to recover after a parsing error, unlike most binary formats.)

In the end, Tim basically said there are two camps here, they both have good points, we aren’t going to convince each other on this one and then proceeded to compromise by doing it his way. Seven years later, we are still paying the price for his dogmatic draconianism.

Update: Tim agrees with the following timeline but disagrees with my conclusion. I would tend to believe him, since he was, you know, there. But we agree on my fundamental point: XML’s error handling has always been controversial, and lots of smart people disagreed with it from the beginning for lots of good reasons.

 

This article was really great and the cmments that followed anyone interesting learning about XML check it out.

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